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Chilean seabass AKA  Patagonian Toothfish is regarded as the number one fish in the world and its price certainly backs up that statement. But why is it so good and also so expensive?

Chilean Seabass became so popular in the 1990s that it was seriously overfished and the factors of supply and demand came into play pushing the price up there with Lobster, Scallops and Scampi. Today the seabass that we use is sustainably harvested but that keeps the price high too.

Chilean seabass is still quite rare, it is also extremely hard to harvest, with boats travelling to the sub-Antarctic, a staggering 4,109 km from mainland Australia lies one of the most inhospitable islands in the world – Heard Island. On the southern tip of this spectacular geographical feature pours into the surrounding treacherous icy waters. Gale force winds, horizontal snow, ten-metre swell and as little as four hours of light per day are just some of what mother nature throws at this incredible Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified sustainable fishery environment for Chilean seabass.

Chilean Seabass projects waygu like characteristics with a complex yet delicate mouthfeel that coats the palate appealingly, making it a pleasure to eat. Its snow-white flesh and broad scalloping flakes display a clean and sweet flavour and the elegant balance of flavour and texture provides a culinary versatility rarely found in fish fillets.

With a high fat and Omega 3 content, the fish is well suited to both dry and moist heat preparations, with the flesh providing a perfect canvas for any number of flavour profiles and combinations, making it well suited to a broad range of cuisines

Herb Crusted Sebass with Roasted Tomatoes

Buy Seabass Fillets

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